One Circle Foundation offers three models — Girls Circle, The Council for Boys and Young Men, and Women's Circle. Our programs employ evidence-based principles of a strengths-based approach, motivational interviewing strategies and have a strong focus on positive youth development. The age old process of communing in a safe circle is the foundational strength of all programs.


The SAFE Home has implemented the Girl’s Circle, a structured support group for girls ages 9-18. The program offers research-based, gender-responsive and youth-relevant program models to individuals, organizations, institutions and communities serving children, teens, young adults, and families. It is designed to foster self-esteem, help girls maintain authentic connections with peers and adult women in their community, counter trends towards self doubt, and allow for genuine self-expression through verbal sharing and creative activity.


The Girl’s Circle curriculum consists of twelve nine-week cycle, each week centers around a different topic. The format has been applied to programs in areas such as juvenile probation, schools, health education, and beyond-wherever girl’s come together.

We currently have active groups that are being held throughout the Laurens Community, which include First Steps GED classes and local churches.  We are working with the PC Community to begin programs on their campus for both women’s and men’s groups.  Laurens County SAFE Home is continually working to administer this program throughout our counties of service.


STATISTICS
Girls Circle participants' surveys revealed statistically significant improvement for girls in four long-term outcomes:

  • A decrease in self-harming behavior.
  • A decrease in rates of alcohol use¹.
  • An increase in attachment to school.
  • An increase in self-efficacy.

Additionally, girls’ surveys revealed significant increases in six skills developed over the short-term:

  • Finding things they have in common with a new person.
  • Trying to see beyond girls' reputations.
  • Telling adults what they need.
  • Feeling good about their body.
  • Picking friends that treat them the way they want to be treated.
  • Telling people how much they mean to them.

In addition, results indicated significant gains in self-efficacy.
The study found that Girls Circle groups benefit girls nearly equally across the subgroups of populations represented, including girls with no history of school problems, girls in juvenile justice programs, foster youth, and LGBT youth. Overall, Girls Circle participants were very satisfied with their groups and their facilitators.
OUTCOMES

Initial results revealed significant increases in perceived social support, perceived body image, and self-efficacy (Adolescence, 2006). The 2005 study which combined juvenile justice, school and prevention settings, found that girls in the juvenile justice settings are more likely to show an increase in perceived social connection (Irvine, A., 2005).

Self-Efficacy - Beliefs in one’s abilities affect important areas of adolescent development such as student identity and peer relationships.

Body Image - Perception of one’s physical appearance has been consistently recognized to be the number one factor in predicting self-esteem. Negative body image can lead to eating disorders, depression, anxiety, sexual difficulties, poor self-esteem, and increased suicide risk.

Perceived Social Support - Social support is defined as the experience or the perception of being cared for, valued, included, and/or guided by others, especially of one’s family, peers, and/or community members. Social support from peers, teachers, and parents has been recognized as a protective factor for children and teens.


The SAFE Home is currently operating the Girl’s Circle and Women’s Circle programs. We hope to expand to holding a group for The Council for Boys and Young Men in the near future.


If you would like  more information about the One Circle Foundation, or would like to inquire about bringing this program to your group, then please contact Tiera Moore, Group Facilitator at
864-682-7270.